2018-08.5: Backshop Clinic Live bonus

31 Aug 2018

TMTV
Rating: 
5
Average: 5 (11 votes)
Summary: 
25:53 - August 2018 Bonus - Pine Street Spur benchwork (2018)
Description: 

The Backshop Clinic Live! is a TMTV series featuring presentations recorded at model train shows.  In this segment, modeler Robin Talukdar shows off construction techniques for benchwork from his Pine Street Spur layout.

Comments

Well done! There was a lot of good information discussed here. Mr. Talukdar has certainly done his research and was able to share in a very understandable presentation.

The waffle construction method is very interesting, and clearly it results in a very strong and light-weight module. But isn't there a lot of waste with the sections of plywood removed to create the waffle? Can any of that be put to good use? 

This was an excellent segment. This has caused me to think very, very seriously of recasting my baseboards in accordance with this design. This design has the obvious advantage of permitting the installation of matters such as turnout controls, wiring, detection units without requiring the agony of working underneath the layout. These modules can simply be pulled out and the relevant items installed with what, so it seems to me, would be a minimum of fuss. Please, please can we have more segments like this one.

joef's picture

Please, please can we have more segments like this one.

If by "more like this one" you mean more on building home layouts using what we have come to call TOMA (The One Module Approach) methods, then yes, more will be coming.

I'm exploring lightweight methods like these along with other innovations to home layout construction with my Siskiyou Line 2 layout. I'm planning to do videos for TrainMasters TV on what I'm learning and will show not only what works, but also show my experiments that failed.

I know some have said TOMA is nothing new ... and it's true that modular show layouts are popular and methods for building them have existed for decades now. What is new is rethinking home layout construction in the light of these methods, as well as evolving other methods using newer materials.

Now that I've started building my Siskiyou Line 2 home layout using this new kind of thinking, I am discovering many new ah-hah's that I never expected. Pulled together, TOMA thinking is opening the door to some interesting new revelations in how to build a home layout. 

We hope to show you in depth what these new approaches can mean with a complete video series about my Siskiyou Line 2 in the weeks and months ahead. Can't give exact dates yet, but stay tuned.

Georonn's picture

Mr. Talukdar,  i think you will find that white glue will soften when you are ballasting, but you may only notice it on curves.  I used white glue initially too and when ballasting the curves I had some movement in the track.  Now I use Loctite foam safe adhesive caulk.  It dries clear and does not soften during ballasting.  I do love the work you’ve done with the light weight construction techniques.  Nicely done.  George 

Could you please clarify the thickness of the plywood used in the frame of the module. I thought I heard you say 3/4" thick plywood, but it doesn't look that thick.

Thanks, Jack Cutler

Have you tried to install turnout motors on the underside? It seems to me that all the ribbing and bracing on the underside may interfere with locating a turnout motor, and may make wiring difficult.

Thanks, Jack Cutler

Could you please clarify the thickness of the plywood used in the frame of the module. I thought I heard you say 3/4" thick plywood, but it doesn't look that thick.

The end plates where the modules join are 3/4" plywood, and the rest is 1/4" Luan plywood.

Have you tried to install turnout motors on the underside? It seems to me that all the ribbing and bracing on the underside may interfere with locating a turnout motor, and may make wiring difficult.

We're not Robin, but we did notice some things about how Robin is doing the Tortoises, so we will give our impressions.

First, there are only TWO full crossmembers, the other triangular braces are only at the bottom 1/4" of the module. So those two crossmembers will be unlikely to interfere with Tortoise installs if you exercise just a bit of caution while planning turnout locations.

Second, installing Tortoises in foam is typically done FROM ABOVE. You mount the Tortoise on a plate like a piece of 1/4" plywood scrap, wire it up, then cut a hole through the foam and also cut out a depression for the plate, then push the wires down through the hole along with the Tortoise. Finally, you install the turnout down over the throwbar wire and you're good to go.

Notice, you never need to get UNDER the module to install the Tortoises in this case. As long as you avoid the two crossmembers, installing the Tortoises through the foam on top is quite easy.

THAT WAS GREAT DETAIL VIDEO LAYOUT BASIC BUY SHOWING HOW DO PUT TOGETHER LAYOUT WITH LIGHTWEIGHT BASIC.

HOPE BE MORE THE DETAIL VIDEO AGAIN AS GREAT TO  WATCH 

Mr. Cutler, what I understood from the video was that the ends of the module were made from 3/4" plywood while the waffle bottom and the other cross pieces were 5 mm (1/4") Birch plywood.

Ed Olszewski

Loved it... I'd really enjoy seeing more backshop clinics like this!

I'll be adopting the aircraft wing style benchwork on my next module after watching this! I've struggled with getting modules resistant to warping (when being transported) and this looks like the perfect fix.

Interesting  and intriguing! 

P Hanzlik's picture

guy comes across knowledgeable, calm and collected. Be a great teacher. Hope to see his layout when he’s done