2017-04.3: Start Small, THINK BIG: Trackwork (pt 4)

21 Apr 2017

TMTV
Rating: 
4.75
Average: 4.8 (28 votes)
Summary: 
22:33 - Apr 2017 Act III - Start Small, THINK BIG: Trackwork (2017)
Description: 

Miles Hale and friends build a project layout in the TrainMasters TV studio using the principles of The "One Module" Approach, also known as TOMA.  In part 4, Pierre Oliver helps Miles install pre-fab flextrack and turnouts on the first section of the layout.  They share tips on roadbed, adhesives, rail joiners, switch machines and more…. to help you build a solid foundation for reliable operation.

Also see:
- Episode 1: Intro - watch now!
- Episode 2: Design - watch now!
- Episode 3: Benchwork - watch now!
- Episode 4: Trackwork (this episode)
- Episode 5: Wiring - watch now!
- Episode 6: Structures - watch now!
- Episode 7: Scenery, pt 1  - watch now!
- Episode 8: Scenery, pt 2 - watch now!
- Episode 9: Adding details - watch now!
- Episode10: Operation - watch now!
- Bonus: Making grass tufts - watch now!

Supplemental attachments:  Section 1 track plan, Tortoise wiring diagram

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Act IV: Crew Call - Rolling Back the Years, Pt. 2 ...

Go to Act IV

Comments

This is an excellent series!  I'm looking forward to the next episode!

I've very sorry to say that I found this chapter of the TOMA series to be a bit disappointing. 

This was just a tutorial on beginning roadbed and track laying. Where were the TOMA elements? Like planning track alignments and techniques for section - to - section transitions, for example? Is that coming in a later chapter?

Are we going to wind up sitting through chapter after chapter of basic layout construction techniques in future months? It seems to me that more time should be spent on discussing and (more importantly) illustrating any special considerations applying the TOMA approach may require or make desirable. In this chapter, for example, the roadbed and tracklaying discussion should have been summarized within a five minute or so segment, and the remaining time spent on those TOMA considerations I mentioned.

Here's hoping for an improved product in the future for this series...

Before painting the rail, why doen't you put oil the rails, such as Conducta lube, or Wahl Oil, so the paint does not stick to the rail.  It should make cleaning with a rag and lacquer thinng much easier.  After all, we always clean our models of any oils before painting for a good paint job.  Seems like the opposite should also be true.

espeelover's picture

This TOMA episode was, as another viewer mentioned, a bit basic, but then that is what this series is all about; it's aimed at newer modelers and not the master model railroader class. It never hurts one to either learn something new, or have a refesher on basic stuff you might not have done in a while; well done people. The tip on cutting those railjoiners in half, plus seeing Miles "custom" tool for this installation was worth the price of admission by itself! That is now in my "to do" pile before my pike rebuild even begins, perfect timing. My planned trackage will be simulating "jointed" rail, so I'll need to add those joint castings along the way too.

I also liked the "how to" on the adhesives used and will be giving them a try, funny, when I think of that brand, I remeber muselage from grammar school (guess that dates me).  The tip on ballasting everything is also a good one, and that will be the norm on this upcoming rebuild in my train room. 

Good stuff guys, keep up the great work! 

This was just a tutorial on beginning roadbed and track laying. Where were the TOMA elements? Like planning track alignments and techniques for section - to - section transitions, for example? Is that coming in a later chapter?

Yes, the track joints between module sections will be covered when we have a second module section to join to. We probably should have mentioned that, however. 

Doing a project layout series is a huge undertaking, and it's difficult to cover everything - we'll probably overlook other folks' favorite question as well now and then. Thanks to comments like this, we can adapt as we go along to cover at least some of the "forgotten" topics in some people's mind  - so your comments are helpful and always appreciated.

pdxglide's picture

Ran this through my apple tv and watched on 65inch screen. Was so much better watching on the big screen, could see so much more.  really like the series

Question: I've always been told to never get adhesive near the points of a turnout, not the hinges, not the throwbar. However, it appears that Miles and Pierre spread their adhesive caulk the full length of the turnouts. Is there a trick to not getting the points stuck using this glue method?

Mike in CO

Considering the cost of turnouts now a days why would you use something to secure track that is going to probably make that switch  trash when you rebuild. I'll stick to track nails at least I won't be throwing away 40 bucks or more when I rebuild.

 

tpmarshall's picture

Considering the cost of turnouts now a days why would you use something to secure track that is going to probably make that switch  trash when you rebuild. I'll stick to track nails at least I won't be throwing away 40 bucks or more when I rebuild.

Well, keep in mind that when you ballast your track, you're going to be flooding the turnout with glue anyway....

If you're really worried about the cost of a turnout, learning to hand-lay them brings down the price considerably - and the turnout-building tools from Fast Tracks make hand-laying an option for almost everyone in the hobby. Then, when you rebuild, your new turnout will cost $4, not $40...

Cheers!

- Trevor

joef's picture

Trevor's point about Fast Track jigs applies to the soldering jigs if you need a lot of the same turnout so the cost of the jigs gets spread across lots of turnouts.

There are also the filing jigs (frog and point filing jig, stock rail filing jig), which can be used for many different turnout configurations so they're a lot easier to cost-justify.

For the soldering part, if you're in HO, you can also use my Poor Man's turnout method as discussed in the Sep 2011 issue of MRH: 

http://model-railroad-hobbyist.com/magazine/mrh-2011-09-sep

This method gets you a great looking turnout for about $5 per turnout for the Central Valley turnout ties. Add another dollar's worth of rail and you get a spot-on-spec turnout that looks great and performs as good as it looks - better than most commercial turnouts, actually.

So Trevor's point still holds - why spend $40 for a new commercial turnout when you can get a better looking and better performing turnout for a LOT less - and thanks to the filing jigs and things like the CVT turnout tie kits, getting a great turnout is easy and affordable for most anyone in HO standard gauge. In other gauges and scales, the Fast Tracks soldering jigs are cost effective if you have a lot of the same turnout that you need.

I've never had an issue with removing a ballasted turnout. Still not so sure I want to take the gamble. I also don't have the time to build my own turnouts. I have watched the videos and found them interesting but not for me at the present time.