2017-03.3: Start Small, THINK BIG - Benchwork (pt 3)

21 Mar 2017

TMTV
Rating: 
4.62963
Average: 4.6 (27 votes)
Summary: 
16:35 - Mar 2017 Act III - Start Small, THINK BIG: Benchwork (2017)
Description: 

Miles Hale and friends build a project layout in the TrainMasters TV studio using the principles of The "One Module" Approach, also known as TOMA.  In part 3, Miles is joined by carpenter Pierre Oliver as they assemble pre-fab benchwork to create three modules for the project.  While the kits screw together quickly and easily, there are lots of opportunities to modify the modules to suit their plan.

Also see:
- Episode 1: Intro - watch now!
- Episode 2: Design - watch now!
- Episode 3: Benchwork (this episode)
- Episode 4: Trackwork - watch now!
- Episode 5: Wiring - watch now!
- Episode 6: Structures - watch now!
- Episode 7: Scenery, pt 1  - watch now!
- Episode 8: Scenery, pt 2 - watch now!
- Episode 9: Adding details - watch now!
- Episode10: Operation - watch now!
- Bonus: Making grass tufts - watch now!

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Comments

I thought you were going with finger flick turnouts nothing under layout ? Was this only Joe's TOMA ?

joef's picture

I thought you were going with finger flick turnouts nothing under layout ? Was this only Joe's TOMA ?

TOMA is an overall approach to doing a layout, but it's not a specific set of methods, per se.

The finger flicking turnouts is MY method for how I am doing TOMA on Siskiyou Line 2. Many of the specific methods used on the TrainMasters TV TOMA project layout differ from how I am doing TOMA on SL2.

That's the beauty of doing a sectional home layout using the "one module" approach (TOMA). The specific methods can vary greatly depending on how YOU prefer to build a sectional / modular home layout.

The website URL for the benchwork used in this episode is: modelrailroadbenchwork.com

Tbgarland's picture

Great idea thinking ahead about where to locate the joist. Most would build the bench work first then rearrange the track. Very forward thinking. Looking forward to the next stage.

Tim

I think it's a good idea to assemble multiple modules at the same time to ensure they fit your available space correctly. My benchwork will be significantly different than your approach though. I'm enjoying the TOMA series more than anything since The Road Show Series.

I am thoroughly enjoying this series. So much so, I'm considering ripping my railroad out and using the toma concept to model the next division.

One question/observation about your build. I assume that the plywood top was pre-drilled and countersunk for the screws prior to assembly?? I was a bit disappointed that this wasn't addressed. Otherwise, this is an excellent tutorial and a great inspiration!! Thoroughly enjoying this series!

One question/observation about your build. I assume that the plywood top was pre-drilled and countersunk for the screws prior to assembly?? I was a bit disappointed that this wasn't addressed. Otherwise, this is an excellent tutorial and a great inspiration!! Thoroughly enjoying this series!

Yes, the benchwork comes as a "kit" with everything pre-cut and pre-drilled. We made a few mods, but nothing that substantially altered the kit parts themselves.

TMTV Station Agent's picture

One question/observation about your build. I assume that the plywood top was pre-drilled and countersunk for the screws prior to assembly?? I was a bit disappointed that this wasn't addressed. Otherwise, this is an excellent tutorial and a great inspiration!! Thoroughly enjoying this series!

True, the benchwork frame and legs are supplied pre-drilled from ModelRailroadBenchWork.com.  The plywood top was not supplied with the benchwork.  And yes, Miles and Pierre drilled and countersunk the holes, which is a good practice whenever using wood screws.

Barry, TMTV producer

This is probably a better question for the benchwork manufacturer, but in the video you mark lines 16" on center in the plywood to align with the stringers underneath. But a 7' table is 84" long where 16" on center (O.C.) would be 80" total if they were all evenly spaced. So how did they "fudge" the other 4 inches of length to maintain that 16" O.C.?

Lee