2015-06.2: Trackside scenery techniques

12 Jun 2015

TMTV
Rating: 
4.76923
Average: 4.8 (26 votes)
Summary: 
56:24 - Jun 2015 Act II - Roadshow: Trackside scenery techniques (2015)
Description: 

Trevor Marshall wraps up The Roadshow series by demonstrating his trackside scenery techniques as his friend Chris Abbott follows along.  Learn about static grass, simulating flowers and shrubs, and "tea-cycling".

Act III: Backshop Clinic: Fine scale structure techniques with Don Railton ...

Go to Act III

Comments

Great scenery tutorial !!!  Thanks Trevor.

tpmarshall's picture

Glad you enjoyed it! Chris, Barry and I really enjoyed shooting this tutorial.

Cheers!

-Trevor

Very good demonstration Trevor

This is one of, if not the best videos TMTV has made.  Excellent demonstration by Trevor and Chris showing how simple and effective scenery is.

 

One suggestion, links to the scenery products would be nice.

Thank you Tevor for your wonderful Roadshow series of videos.  You and Trainmasters TV have opened a whole new world for me and many other modelers. Please continue passing along your talent in such a great way.

Andy Suchan 

tpmarshall's picture

Hi Bruce:

Thanks for the kind words - we try!

For scenery sources, it should be fairly straightforward to find what you need at Scenic Express or a well-stocked local hobby shop.

I did not include links because scenery is subjective - what works for me might not work for others.

As an example, each modeler will have their own preference for leaf material colors and textures,

I would encourage everyone to experiment. Go to the hobby shop and buy some materials and try them out. If they work - great. If not - try something else. The squares I used to demonstrate techniques are a great way to experiment. They're about 12"x12", so a sheet of insulation should yield 16 squares for plenty of practice!

As I said in the introduction to this segment, there is a right-and-wrong with wiring, but scenery is wide open and forgiving.

Happy modeling!

-Trevor

Very informative as always.  I enjoyed watching Chris follow along and demonstrate it as well.  Good teaching technique that encourages this newbie (me) that scenery is forgiving while getting good results.

tpmarshall's picture

Hi Everyone:

Thanks for the postivive feedback - and yes, Barry and I are talking about future projects, including more scenery how-tos.

Cheers!

- Trevor

Nice job...I watched most of your videos prior to you taking the moduals to the show, liked them all...couple Questions, how did or has the no more nails adhesive held up when using it to adhere to the pink foam, I wanna try that but a bit chicken, ..does the adhesive hold up in temperature and humidity changes?? I also will try the talcom powder concrete technique...I wonder if sifted dry plaster of paris would work too?? Thank you for the tips.

 

tpmarshall's picture

Hi Daniel:

Thanks for the positive feedback - much appreciated!

The No More Nails has held up just fine. As long as ONE surface to be bonded is porus, it'll work. So, bonding wood to foam works without issues.

Bonding styrene to foam is trickier - since neither surface is porus. Fortunately, the fascia is bonded to the wood framing below the foam.

We left the module sections in the sun one time and the fascia rippled as the heat expanded the black styrene. The good news is that when we took the module sections out of the sun, and they cooled, the fascia straigthened out again with no long-term issues. Our solution is to not leave the modules in the sun anymore...

I haven't tried the plaster of paris technique. I suggest you experiment on a piece of painted stryene. Talcum powder is very easy to find - just ask your barber, who will have bottles of it for brushing around your neck after a shave and a hair cut. I got mine from my barber - $8 cash in hand for the bottle you see in the show, and it'll last me for many, many projects to come. It smells nice, too...

Cheers!

- Trevor

I had been umming and ahhing whether to take the step and pay for train master tv, I mean YouTube has some great content so why do I need to pay right? All I can say is WOW, I'm so glad I took the leap to pay for a 12 month subscription..... I can tell you now that I'll be renewing my subscription for 3 years when the year is up! So far the road show series has been fantastic. It's late and I know I should go to bed but I keep telling myself, one more!

Thank you for a great service I'll be looking forward to the next episodes! 

Great job Trevor, can't wait to see your next series.

Cheers
Luke.

tpmarshall's picture

Hi, Luke:

Thanks for the positive feedback - I'm really glad you've enujoyed the series. Barry and I are working on some new ideas too - so there will be more to watch in the year(s) ahead.

Cheers!

- Trevor

Brilliant video. One of the best on Trainmasters. Chris and Trevor make a good team.

- Conor

Just finished watching this series.  The Roadshow series alone makes a TMTV subscription worthwhile.  

Thanks for taking the time to put these together Trevor.

 

tpmarshall's picture

Much appreciated. I'm glad you enjoyed the series.

Happy modeling!

- Trevor

Trevor and Chris,

Great demo. My wife watched this episode with me and we were both struck with the same thought. I was having trouble with Trevor's "don't worry about it, it's good enough", while Christy was having trouble with Chris' more structured approach. That's why she is painting my backdrop!

Chris does a great job of asking questions to provide context for people like me understand what's going on. I would have liked to see more of that banter.

Really enjoyed watching all of the shows.

Trevor is a natural at teaching techniques and he has a very calm, soothing voice. Great to see so many fellow Canadians involved in TMTV as well. :)

One thing though I can't agree with is his comment that in N scale grass can just be represented with paint - I think in all scales texture is very important and paint is always flat and will look like a painted surface. What I do is use 2mm static grass and then add fine dirt sifted in between the grass fibres which can shorten them to only 1mm long which is 160mm. For a well trimmed grass plot I use very fine ground foam, as Trevor mentions, with a base coat of paint in a dirt colour.

Marc

 

Trevor,

As promised yesterday, I viewed the scenery video again last night to watch the part about the Gras-Master tool and recognized immediately that I had already seen the video when it first published.  But, because I so enjoy your TMTV segments I decided to watch the whole thing again.  In so doing, I remembered that it was this video that got me to pull the trigger on purchasing the Gras-Master 2.0.  I had tried other, lower power static grass applicators without success but just did not want to spend the money for the Gras-Master.  The good news is that your video showed me that it worked and that it was a tool I should have.  The other thing I remembered was it was your segment that stated the grounding nail should be in the wet field.  I had this thought in the back of my mind when I started practicing with the tool, but almost all the other tutorials I had seen, including the instructions that come with the tool did not state this.  In fact, I have had success in practice sessions getting good results without the grounding nail in the wet field.  However, as I stated in a previous post, I have been having trouble with the nozzle applicator.  Given your advice on putting the nail in the wet field, I gave the nozzle another try last night, and voila, I got good results!  So thanks for that tip.  Also,  I have been practicing with just about all the various static grass colors and sizes from Scenic Express, Noch and Heki and noted that color variation is rather limited and few truly represent what I seen in nature.  Your tip on using acrylic ink to 'shade' the commercial color is brilliant and has given me hope that I can get the color and variation I seek.

Keep up the good work.  While I enjoy all that TMTV offers, your segments are MUST sees for me because the subjects always seem to coincide with where I am at in my modeling evolution, they are rich in content (I often have to take notes to keep track of everything offered) and clearly demonstrate that most skills are in fact quite simple to learn and use.

Thanks so much for your time and effort in supporting us modelers and TMTV!

Dave Curtin

tpmarshall's picture

Dave, I'm blushing. Thank for the kind words!

I'm glad the video was able to help you with the nozzle applicator. And I think you'll find the acrylic ink trick to be very effective. I've used it on my own layout - here's a post about that from my layout blog:

http://themodelrailwayshow.com/cn1950s/?p=4019

Cheers!

- Trevor

Trevor,

Do you recall the manufacturer of the finely ground pink/purple-ish material you used to simulate flower tops in the grass?

Dave

tpmarshall's picture

Hi Dave:

If I recall, this material was included in some kits from Busch for HO scale tobacco plants:

http://www.busch-model.com/online/produktinfos/grafiken/1221.jpg

I used these for my S scale home layout, and decided that since the plants would be shorter - and therefore earlier in the growing season - they would not be in flower.

I'm not sure if the flower material is sold separately. That said, I encourage you to check a well-stocked hobby shop (or Scenic Express) to see what's available.

Cheers!

- Trevor

Trevor,

Thanks for the response!

I am a scenery material 'junky' and am well versed in the Scenic Express catalogue.  I read that thing like the Christmas Toy catalogues from days gone by!  

I have yet to find any material that is as finely ground as that material you used seems to be.

But, thanks for the lead on Busch, I might need to refresh my knowledge on their products offered by Scenic Express.

Dave

Hello Trevor,

 

Thank you so much for explaining your scenery methods in such a well organized flow.  I have enjoyed all of your shows to date and think you have such a smooth and professional approach to every Roadshow episode.  I plan to use many of your techniques as the results you achieve are fantastic.  I was wondering if you know which Scenic Express number is associated with the Flock & Turf you used on your scenery module? I really like the idea of having a mix of colors and textures instead of just one texture and one color.  I beleive it is one of their blends such as Scrub grass or Blended meadow.

Thanks for your help and thanks for the great shows!

 

Regards,

Scott

tpmarshall's picture

Hi Scott:

Thanks for the kind words. I'm glad you enjoyed this feature on scenery.

Of the top of my head, I can't remember what the product number was for the flock and turf. My suggestion is buy one bottle each of a few blends on offer, and see which one you like best. The runner-up blends can be used in less visible areas of a layout - such as under trees. Or you can pass them along to a friend.

Happy modeling!

- Trevor

Thanks Trevor,

That's a great idea on using multiple blends and using the one's not picked in the back areas.  Thanks so much for getting back to me so quickly and thanks for the very professional videos you do for all of modelers.

 

Regards,

Scott

tpmarshall's picture

I've had a number of people ask for the product numbers for the materials I used in this segment. The short answer is, I didn't share product numbers on purpose.

The scenery I created in this segment, for my southern Ontario scene, will be different than what you need for your scene, I suspect.

I didn’t want to provide specific products because scenery should be about developing one’s own eye for it, not blindly following what someone else does. Even though I'm showing you the way I do things, this should only be one approach that you use in your own scenery modeling - and should only be considered a guide at best, not gospel. You'll want to experiment with products - either store-bought, or natural - and techniques, go discover what looks right for you.

If I were asked for one piece of advice, I'd suggest if you're new to scenery then make up some 12″ square test boards, like I used in the show, and practice your techniques on them before tackling the layout. Artists rarely paint the final picture in the first go - and they typically paint several studies (on a smaller canvas) to experiment with composition, etc.

As for materials - buy some, and try them. If they work for you, great! If they do not, then buy different materials and layer them on top. Or toss the test boards and start fresh – until you get the look that works for you. That’s the thing about scenery: There are few wrong answers, yet not everybody’s “right” answer will be the same. It’s not like building a model of a specific boxcar, where right and wrong are absolute…

Cheers!